Genuine Parts

StreetSleeper

Full Member
On occasions I have bought genuine parts for my van off eBay. My recent purchase I think I paid over the odds because they were genuine, when the box arrived I looked at the brake shoes and to my surprise they were stamped with the word Lucas and not Peugeot/Citroen. Though the box looked genuine I have to question whether Lucas brake shoes should be inside and not ones that have the logo of Citroen & Peugeot. When I questioned this with the dealer he said it was standard practice to use parts from other manufacturers on brand new vehicles. When I looked at another advert I could clearly see the Peugeot/Citroen logo on the brake shoe in the same position as where my Lucas stamp was. So my question here is: is it worth buying genuine parts as they all could be patterned and is this man correct in what he's saying?

Rae
 

Reiverlad

Full Member
Having a genuine part number on an item is no guarantee of getting a quality item.

Before i retired I worked to find customers in this country for manufacturers abroad, including China.
We used to bring in thousands of various aftersales market items for Peugot/ Citreon & Landrover.
All were stamped with the correct part number - so nobody would have any idea where they were produced.
9 years ago we brought into this country
a "genuine" Citreon wheel brace complete with part number for around 60p &
a "genuine" Landrover 2 tonne bottle jack also complete with part number for around £8

I am not saying they were poor quality as I know the bottle jacks were tested to within an inch of their life !!

What i am saying is that having a "genuine" part number really tells you nothing - and i would reckon that applies to most manufacturers as well
 

wildebus

Full Member
I would say what the guy is saying sounds right. They buy in branded consumables and I honestly would be amazed if when you go to a Citroen or Peugeot (or whatever) Dealer and buy a set of pads or shoes that they are branded to a specfic make apart from the cardboard packaging they come in.
I have noticed lots of adverts for stuff where the same pictures are used for loads of different car makes and that makers name/logo superimposed on the image.

I would pay a bit of a premium price for a recognised brand that I know the car maker uses (such as Lucas, Bosch, Gates, or whatever) over a copy part.
 

StreetSleeper

Full Member
Thank you for all the replies. The only thing I can say is, in my naivety, when I buy genuine brake shoes this is what I expect. If you notice the bottom left hand side you can see the logo and not Lucas so, obviously, they are out there I shall just have to be a bit more careful when choosing a vendor.



Rae
 

Okta

Full Member
They may well be out there but does that make them more genuine? I doubt that Peugeot /Citroen make brake linings, the Lucas ones could well come off the same production line. Perhaps the only difference is that P/C get their logo stamped on theirs because they are big enough to do so.
 

SimonM

Full Member
Before I retired I was purchasing manager for a large group of motor factors. There is no such thing as “genuine” as the major manufacturers actually make very few parts themselves when it comes to the kind of things we would tend to need to replace. They buy them in from specialist makers and then assemble the vehicle around the chassis and panelwork they actually form themselves.
 

SimonM

Full Member
Btw, Peugeot Citroen were the absolute worst of the ass Elbert as they would regularly mix component makers on the production line without keeping records of whose bits they were fitting. Thus it was imperative that if someone wanted rear brake cylinders for a Peugeot 205 for example we would have to send out 3 different makes to ensure the customer got the correct ones to fit.

Remember the mnemonic for the French car makers

Citroen
Renault
And
Peugeot

They are the worst for fitting crappy parts to their cars that don’t last very long, stick to a German car for a bit more quality.
 

RV2MAX

Full Member
Years ago I was works engineer for a subsidiary of Lucas , we used to package electrical parts for , Lucas , Hella, Brown Bros, Wipac , to name a few , , and Unipart used to do the same . One example was bulbs , different boxes , and they were sourced from Hong Kong, and Poland ! I have also, in a different operation sourced Landcruiser parts for aftermarket , from same factory that supplied OE to Toyota , they sold at about 60% of gen packaged price.
 

nickvanbitz

Full Member
This is why I tend to spend a bit of time researching service parts for my own vehicles.
Most of the time you find the mains component to be manufactured by someone else, but rebranded for the manufacturer. This sure does apply to my Hilux after having the injectors changed recently. Went direct to a Denso specialist instead of buying Denso injectors through the local Toyota dealer (although the injector seals did come from the dealer, as they have a bit of a reputation to fail if using non genuine).
Normally tend to wait on deals through Euro Car Parts when they have their huge discount days, but pick on the higher end makes like Brembo Brakes and Bosch Filters. Xmas/New year is when I stockpile my service items for the following year, when they normally do things like 50% off service and brake parts (works out better than trade).
 

wildebus

Full Member
Btw, Peugeot Citroen were the absolute worst of the ass Elbert as they would regularly mix component makers on the production line without keeping records of whose bits they were fitting. Thus it was imperative that if someone wanted rear brake cylinders for a Peugeot 205 for example we would have to send out 3 different makes to ensure the customer got the correct ones to fit.

Remember the mnemonic for the French car makers

Citroen
Renault
And
Peugeot

They are the worst for fitting crappy parts to their cars that don’t last very long, stick to a German car for a bit more quality.
Interestingly, of the various cars I have bought and/or ran, excluding the real POS for reliability in the early 80's that was my Company Austin Ambassador, the worst for repairs have been the supposedly ultra-reliable Toyotas and a Honda, plus the wonderously well-built VW (which cost me around £3,000 of repairs in 18 months despite costing the previous owner over £10k in fixs in the two years before they sold it to me)

The Citroens I have had (3 of) have needed very little other than a premature exhaust fell off the BX; the Peugeots (2 of) needed nowt, and the single Renault (a £50 Renault 12) was also free of running costs. The other supposed disaster area of automobiles, FIAT (yes, we know, Fix It Again Tomorrow ...) was experienced with a brace of Puntos, each running for around 6 years with no breakdowns. Even the 5 Montegos were better than the Japanese gear for visits to a garage!
 

nickvanbitz

Full Member
FIAT (yes, we know, Fix It Again Tomorrow ...) was experienced with a brace of Puntos, each running for around 6 years with no brakedowns
I have to say the wife's 1999 Punto Sporting she had from new was a cracking little car. Regularly serviced and maintained, biggest jobs were a new clutch and the electronic power steering motor. Only reason we sold it on was we were advised the floor was going to need welding in the no-so distant future, so...…………………………… she went and bought a new shape Panda Sport. Touch wood, still no issues in the last 5 years!!
 

Okta

Full Member
My experience with an 80’s Ambassador was the complete opposite. I have never had a less reliable piece of junk, with dealer support to match. Both went under.
 

maingate

Full Member
You still see some well known British brand names about. The problem is that they closed a long time ago and (usually) the Chinese buy the right to use the name. So, your longstanding loyalty to a brand name can be a bad move. Filters (all types) are a prime example.
 

daygoboy

Free Member
Before I retired I was purchasing manager for a large group of motor factors. There is no such thing as “genuine” as the major manufacturers actually make very few parts themselves when it comes to the kind of things we would tend to need to replace. They buy them in from specialist makers and then assemble the vehicle around the chassis and panelwork they actually form themselves.
Didn't Rolls Royce even get their body shells built by Pressed Steel?, Mulliner, Park Ward,
their headlights from Lucas. Fords in the 60's used to manufacture a high percentage
of their own parts, they even had their own foundry in Dagenham.
Much the same as Toyota they even made a large % of electrical parts for their cars, not
so nowadays apparently.
Now you find several manufacturers even share the same engine for a model, most of the parts
interchangeable.
 

Wully

Full Member
I had a ford maverick four wheel drive that was actually a Nissan terrano with a ford badge stuck on it I went to a parts place think it was euro parts asked for a set of brake pads and disks for it as ford parts they wanted £250 but as Nissan parts they were £140 same parts same boxes just different part numbers on the little stickers on boxes we looked and opened both sets they were identical.
 
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