Parked Up Aircraft

Val54

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It is very strange Bill, we are on the westerly approach for Manchester and we only saw one Ryanair go in late yesterday, we are also on the north/south path for light aircraft and around lunchtime, two old biplanes passed over chugging north, and that’s it, nothing today, no cargo, nothing. It is eerily quiet.

This plane tracker screenshot says it all ....... normally would be plastered with planes!

55E1B3C5-5F9E-42BC-BF20-D5FFD3338005.png

That’s a Stansted to Dublin Ryanair at the bottom of the shot.
 

2cv

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Likewise, we can hear the Glasgow aircraft normally but quiet as could be recently. Just took this screenshot. Just an RAF Hercules and a couple of Twin Otters to the islands.

064CEE2E-F112-49C9-9ED1-A3F7BF2A770B.png
 

2cv

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Certainly aviation is an industry which could look very different after all this. Only the strongst will survive I think.
 

Tezza33

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We live close to East Midlands Airport and normally we see planes taking off constantly, it is eerily quiet now, it is funny how you don't hear them eventually when you have lived so close but now it is obvious how much noise the airport made.
 
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runnach

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We are below the flightpath for EDI. I asked Gavin (easyjet pilot) what is that noise that I hear at times, which is similar to a revving up, he said "that his colleagues do this deliberate to annoy him".

Would this be true, Bill?
 

2cv

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We are below the flightpath for EDI. I asked Gavin (easyjet pilot) what is that noise that I hear at times, which is similar to a revving up, he said "that his colleagues do this deliberate to annoy him".

Would this be true, Bill?
There is a possibility. Could be the noise made when speedbrakes are out though.
 

runnach

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There is a possibility. Could be the noise made when speedbrakes are out though.
Yep, that is the word, speed brakes. Hard to say actual altitude aircraft are at as they pass over, they are still a fair bit up as they head towards Musselburgh then port turn as aircraft head up the Firth of Forth.

So, they are being naughty :giggle:
 

jagmanx

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Devastation of the airline industry is devastion for millions of pounds and jobs etc.
Stocks amd shares ie pension funds
More unemployment all round
Air crew Ground crew, support services.
Shops restaurants in airports, those who supply them, travel agents.
The list is very very long !
And lots more
Lastly no more flights at reasonable prices !
 
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Val54

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Yep, that is the word, speed brakes. Hard to say actual altitude aircraft are at as they pass over, they are still a fair bit up as they head towards Musselburgh then port turn as aircraft head up the Firth of Forth.

So, they are being naughty :giggle:
Glad we don’t live next to a pilot then ...... 😂. Excluding Bill of course ..........
 

mistericeman

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Glad we don’t live next to a pilot then ...... 😂. Excluding Bill of course ..........
I've got a mate that drives trains from Buxton quarries....
A mutual friend of ours lives at the side of the viaduct in Buxton, his bedroom is in the loft at track height right next to the track....

Guess who gets a toot of the train horn every time every time it passes with our friend driving. ;-)
 

2cv

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Yep, that is the word, speed brakes. Hard to say actual altitude aircraft are at as they pass over, they are still a fair bit up as they head towards Musselburgh then port turn as aircraft head up the Firth of Forth.

So, they are being naughty :giggle:
Not necessarily. The ideal descent into Edinburgh starts up to 150 miles away with the aim being to keep the engines idling until 1000 ft. With restrictions due to other aircraft or shortening of the route planned the ideal descent may need adjustment. With a longer route thrust must be added, but with a shorter route speedbrakes are needed to give greater drag if the aircraft is not to arrive too high or fast at the 1000 ft point.
So whilst they may be being naughty, probably you just happen to live in an area where drag is often needed on the approach.
 
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