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Solo travellers- how do you manage?

V1nny

Full Member

Messages
88
We have had our motorhome for 5 years, and for the first time I have travelled on my own. I’ve just driven from Scotland to Santander on my way to collect my family from the airport before continuing south into Portugal, and it never occurred to me how difficult it can be without someone with you.

Things like:-
Someone on the other side of the cab who can crane their neck to see into sharp junctions,
Someone to navigate,
Someone to get in the back to close the cutlery drawer that flies open at the first roundabout, every time I drive away. (I know it’s my fault but I’m starting to think I’ve got a poltergeist because it feels like even when I think I’ve checked, it flies open again!)
Someone to make a sandwich when you’re starving but you can’t stop because all the service areas and parking places suddenly seem to have disappeared
Someone to study the maps and apps to decide on the next aire

I could go on, but for the solo travellers out there, I have nothing but admiration for your endurance.

Was it worth it to avoid 5 days of “are we there yet, are we there yet?” At the moment I think not, but after a few days listening to teenagers bickering again, I might change my mind and dream of the solo life again
 

Minisorella

Moderator

Messages
1,325
I felt the same after my husband died. I had no choice but to tweak a few routines and plan ahead a lot more, ie make a sandwich and flask of coffee before leaving and make sure all the 'bits' that always go flying are anchored down.... with me it's the bathroom and fridge doors. Those sharp junctions can still be a big problem now and then but mostly I try to position the van squarely right-angled to the dotted lines, even if it means hogging the road. I often have to get out when reversing to check for low stuff behind me. The worst bit is not having someone to share the delight at those "Wow! Look at that!" moments. On the other hand, I can listen to whatever music I like and never, ever get criticised by or squabble with my passenger seat :ROFLMAO:
 

Trotter

Full Member

Messages
1,268
We have had our motorhome for 5 years, and for the first time I have travelled on my own. I’ve just driven from Scotland to Santander on my way to collect my family from the airport before continuing south into Portugal, and it never occurred to me how difficult it can be without someone with you.

Things like:-
Someone on the other side of the cab who can crane their neck to see into sharp junctions,
Someone to navigate,
Someone to get in the back to close the cutlery drawer that flies open at the first roundabout, every time I drive away. (I know it’s my fault but I’m starting to think I’ve got a poltergeist because it feels like even when I think I’ve checked, it flies open again!)
Someone to make a sandwich when you’re starving but you can’t stop because all the service areas and parking places suddenly seem to have disappeared
Someone to study the maps and apps to decide on the next aire

I could go on, but for the solo travellers out there, I have nothing but admiration for your endurance.

Was it worth it to avoid 5 days of “are we there yet, are we there yet?” At the moment I think not, but after a few days listening to teenagers bickering again, I might change my mind and dream of the solo life again
It’s fun isn’t it? After eleven weeks away, I wish I could give you an answer. I suppose it’s just a case of, get on with it.
The one thing I had a problem with, more than any other, was when I saw something spectacular . There was no one to say, “ Wow, look at that,” to.
On the plus side, I had ownership of the radio, if I wanted to shout at the satnav, I could. So it wasn’t so bad
 

Caz

Full Member

Messages
317
Study maps, plan route and aires the night before and set sat nav before leaving in the morning.
Stop regularly for dog to have a walk and you can check the map (although I tend to just rely on the sat nav), make a butty & a coffee, and forget to push the knob in on the cutlery drawer again after making the butty. Stop at next layby after it has crashed on to floor so you can pick it all up and close it properly this time.
 

V1nny

Full Member

Messages
88
Study maps, plan route and aires the night before and set sat nav before leaving in the morning.
Stop regularly for dog to have a walk and you can check the map (although I tend to just rely on the sat nav), make a butty & a coffee, and forget to push the knob in on the cutlery drawer again after making the butty. Stop at next layby after it has crashed on to floor so you can pick it all up and close it properly this time.
That’s a relief to know Im not the only one that forgets the cutlery drawer. But every time I do it I think to myself I’m not going to let that happen again. Every time!
 

Caz

Full Member

Messages
317
Yep, every time!

P.S. I avoid tolls where possible. I get out and walk round to pay machines - I can't even reach the ones on my side in UK.
 

witzend

Full Member

Messages
267
Toll,s is simple get a toll tag about 15€ then 2.30€ every month you use it you can get it online posted to uk try Atmb cheapest postage when I got mine
 

Rockburner

Full Member

Messages
187
I bought a blindspot mirror from Halfords and fitted it above the nearside mirror - angled it right out so that it shows the angle you can't quite see when you're at a y-junction. Very handy - even in the UK.

Only issue is stopping the cheap mirror surface corroding.
 

Glass man

Full Member

Messages
74
I angle the passenger passenger seat slightly and make sure the curtain for the window behind is fully to the rear of the van. This gives a much better view looking left at junctions.
Driving up to junctions at a right angle and then turning the steering wheel hard at the last moment will also help as you get a good view to both sides and have the wheel in the correct direction for starting off.
 

Trotter

Full Member

Messages
1,268
Not sure how you get on with a coach build, but with a panel van, if you make sure the sliding door window is clear of obstruction, positioning at a junction at the right angle, it’s not a problem. Simples!
Only took me a week or so to work that out ?
 

Campervanannie

Full Member

Messages
4,068
I’ve travelled over 30 years on my own though I do take my other half Bill occasionally, you just get on with it every problem has a solution it’s just finding the one that works for you.?
 

chrsrwlns

Full Member

Messages
14
We have had our motorhome for 5 years, and for the first time I have travelled on my own. I’ve just driven from Scotland to Santander on my way to collect my family from the airport before continuing south into Portugal, and it never occurred to me how difficult it can be without someone with you.

Things like:-
Someone on the other side of the cab who can crane their neck to see into sharp junctions,
Someone to navigate,
Someone to get in the back to close the cutlery drawer that flies open at the first roundabout, every time I drive away. (I know it’s my fault but I’m starting to think I’ve got a poltergeist because it feels like even when I think I’ve checked, it flies open again!)
Someone to make a sandwich when you’re starving but you can’t stop because all the service areas and parking places suddenly seem to have disappeared
Someone to study the maps and apps to decide on the next aire

I could go on, but for the solo travellers out there, I have nothing but admiration for your endurance.

Was it worth it to avoid 5 days of “are we there yet, are we there yet?” At the moment I think not, but after a few days listening to teenagers bickering again, I might change my mind and dream of the solo life again
I was a long distance HGV driver for over 46 years, so driving my motorhome on my own is very natural to me. I am so used to being on my own that I couldn't even stand my Mother staying for more than a week when she came to my home to visit. This all means that I much prefer being on my own. In the case of road junctions, especially at junctions where the adjoining road comes from almost behind you, instead of trying to get the front of your vehicle level with the white line, or craning your neck, It's usually much easier to position the vehicle side on so that you can see the road you are joining in the n/side mirror. As for maps, if you have a smartphone, I recommend downloading "Navigator" from Mapfactor. I used this in my lorry and still use it now. Just put in the town, or postcode if known, and put it in a holder. If you do go wrong, it will automatically find the best way back onto the route. I've just finished a trip all round Scotland, and never took a wrong turn the whole journey.
 

Raddy

Free Member

Messages
4
And I nearly forgot the worst bit, the tolls when you have to stop and clamber across to the passenger side window and stretch out for a ticket or to pay
Even with a Passenger in a Rascal, Picking up Class 2 Tolls all across the entire of France the Ticket comes out at LGV Lorry Height and can't be collected without getting out to get it via standing on the Passenger Seat with the door open.SIMG1586 LOS YESOS - GRANADA - NORTH - AUGUST 2006.jpg
 

Minisorella

Moderator

Messages
1,325
I was a long distance HGV driver for over 46 years, so driving my motorhome on my own is very natural to me. I am so used to being on my own that I couldn't even stand my Mother staying for more than a week when she came to my home to visit. This all means that I much prefer being on my own. In the case of road junctions, especially at junctions where the adjoining road comes from almost behind you, instead of trying to get the front of your vehicle level with the white line, or craning your neck, It's usually much easier to position the vehicle side on so that you can see the road you are joining in the n/side mirror. As for maps, if you have a smartphone, I recommend downloading "Navigator" from Mapfactor. I used this in my lorry and still use it now. Just put in the town, or postcode if known, and put it in a holder. If you do go wrong, it will automatically find the best way back onto the route. I've just finished a trip all round Scotland, and never took a wrong turn the whole journey.
I do that too if the angle is really severe... works a treat :)
 

grath

Full Member

Messages
2,550
I wonder how we truckers got on, all alone and before sat nav
We just angled the vehicle at road junctions
At a peage. we would either get out and walk around or climb over the engine to the other side window
And for navigation we used a map for between towns and asked for directions when near to a destination.
Easy really, nothing to go wrong!
 

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