The Bread Making Thread

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I've always enjoyed cooking (it's the closest I get to physics, chemistry and biochemistry these days) and have recently got into bread making. So far I've been focusing on sourdough bread and this is my latest loaf with pumpkin and sunflower seeds:

IMG_20191220_114602.jpg

I got a taste for sourdough bread pretty much as the Berlin wall was breached and I spent many years travelling to and from and living in the former GDR. Frankly the 'sourdough' bread sold in supermarkets here isn't the real deal - it generally has conventional baker's yeast in it so that the all-important slow rise is by-passed and costs are cut. Sourdough bread made in Germany (and, of course, by artisan British bakers) is still made in the traditional way and, in my view, is well worth the extra cost.
My next adventure will be into Aussie Damper. Like soda bread it doesn't use yeast but depends on bicarbonate of soda for the rise. I'll be experimenting with self raising flour initially. I reckon this will make it a quick and easy loaf to make in the Moho. Australians often make this kind of bread when cooking on a campfire.
Then it'll be a foray into Irish-style soda bread, which again uses bicarbonate of soda instead of yeast but also an acid to generate carbon dioxide and so cause the loaf to rise.
Any other bread fans out there in our community?

Colin 🙂🙂🙂
 

GreggBear

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I've always enjoyed cooking (it's the closest I get to physics, chemistry and biochemistry these days) and have recently got into bread making. So far I've been focusing on sourdough bread and this is my latest loaf with pumpkin and sunflower seeds:

View attachment 52044

I got a taste for sourdough bread pretty much as the Berlin wall was breached and I spent many years travelling to and from and living in the former GDR. Frankly the 'sourdough' bread sold in supermarkets here isn't the real deal - it generally has conventional baker's yeast in it so that the all-important slow rise is by-passed and costs are cut. Sourdough bread made in Germany (and, of course, by artisan British bakers) is still made in the traditional way and, in my view, is well worth the extra cost.
My next adventure will be into Aussie Damper. Like soda bread it doesn't use yeast but depends on bicarbonate of soda for the rise. I'll be experimenting with self raising flour initially. I reckon this will make it a quick and easy loaf to make in the Moho. Australians often make this kind of bread when cooking on a campfire.
Then it'll be a foray into Irish-style soda bread, which again uses bicarbonate of soda instead of yeast but also an acid to generate carbon dioxide and so cause the loaf to rise.
Any other bread fans out there in our community?

Colin 🙂🙂🙂
Major bread fan here mate! Your loaf looks delish. Love Irish soda bread & fancy making damper bread too, but anything unsliced & blathered in Lurpak gets my vote!....😋👍
 
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2cv

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I've always enjoyed cooking (it's the closest I get to physics, chemistry and biochemistry these days) and have recently got into bread making. So far I've been focusing on sourdough bread and this is my latest loaf with pumpkin and sunflower seeds:

View attachment 52044

I got a taste for sourdough bread pretty much as the Berlin wall was breached and I spent many years travelling to and from and living in the former GDR. Frankly the 'sourdough' bread sold in supermarkets here isn't the real deal - it generally has conventional baker's yeast in it so that the all-important slow rise is by-passed and costs are cut. Sourdough bread made in Germany (and, of course, by artisan British bakers) is still made in the traditional way and, in my view, is well worth the extra cost.
My next adventure will be into Aussie Damper. Like soda bread it doesn't use yeast but depends on bicarbonate of soda for the rise. I'll be experimenting with self raising flour initially. I reckon this will make it a quick and easy loaf to make in the Moho. Australians often make this kind of bread when cooking on a campfire.
Then it'll be a foray into Irish-style soda bread, which again uses bicarbonate of soda instead of yeast but also an acid to generate carbon dioxide and so cause the loaf to rise.
Any other bread fans out there in our community?

Colin 🙂🙂🙂

Love the look of that loaf. I too love German bread and was in Berlin when the wall came down.
Susie often makes Irish type soda bread, here’s todays.

5B893A1D-80E4-4A18-9682-901ABE021AA5.jpeg
 

andyjanet

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I’m a fan also,
There places that do artisan bread making courses for around £60
4 hrs and make about five different loaves,
I did the course and would recommend to all,
You work with wholemeal sourdough rye ciabatta,
I make a nice apricot and date, with honey and brown sugar crust, it doesn’t get put in the cupboard and it’s barely out the silicon mould before the first bit is buttered 🤣
 

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That loaf looks delicious Colin, any chance of putting your recipe on here, for the rest of us to try?

I'm using pretty much the kind of no-knead recipe found here or there, Rog.
Having watched and helped a German baker (who was also a friend) in the GDR overnight, I've now decided to omit the banneton stage simply because it's a bit of a faff and many professionals don't bother - though it does make for a pretty loaf. I simply let the bread prove in the lidded (casserole) dish that the loaf will bake in.
Today's loaf had 55 minutes at 250°C with the casserole lid on followed by 20 minutes at 230°C with the lid off.

I'll be interested to know how you get on.

Colin :):):)
 

wildebus

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My favourite bread by far is what my family just refer to as "German Bread" (seems to be a common preference for Breads from Germany in this thread).
Have only really found the 'genuine' article in, not surprisingly, Germany. Tried various different shops and the closest I have found is at Waitrose from, IIRC, 'The Village Bakery'.
As far as I know it is a Rye Bread and a heavy bread. And one notable difference is it just doesn't go mouldy! unlike the typical bread load made by UK and loved by consumers that go green in days, the "German Bread" I like just doees go mouldy, just goes hard eventually.

So if anyone knows where to buy (or how to make?) this bread it would be mega! A picture below of what the sort of bread I am talking about looks like ...

 

2cv

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My favourite bread by far is what my family just refer to as "German Bread" (seems to be a common preference for Breads from Germany in this thread).
Have only really found the 'genuine' article in, not surprisingly, Germany. Tried various different shops and the closest I have found is at Waitrose from, IIRC, 'The Village Bakery'.
As far as I know it is a Rye Bread and a heavy bread. And one notable difference is it just doesn't go mouldy! unlike the typical bread load made by UK and loved by consumers that go green in days, the "German Bread" I like just doees go mouldy, just goes hard eventually.

So if anyone knows where to buy (or how to make?) this bread it would be mega! A picture below of what the sort of bread I am talking about looks like ...


Possibly available at Falko in Haddington.
 

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Love the look of that loaf. I too love German bread and was in Berlin when the wall came down.
Susie often makes Irish type soda bread, here’s todays.

View attachment 52052

That really does look good, Bill.
Any chance of posting Susie's recipe or a link to it?

Colin :):):)
 

jagmanx

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Yes home-made is great.
I prefer bread that can be cooked quickly and having found Tesco's do good frozen Paratha I have experimented.
Not always successful BUT this one is good and easy
LINK
Milk-butter paratha

Prep time; 15 mins
Waiting time; 40 mins
Cooking time; 15 mins
Total time; 1 hour 10 mins

Ingredients
2 cups all purpose flour + 2 tablespoons for dusting and rolling
¾ tsp salt
3½ tablespoons butter
¾ cup milk
Butter for rolling and cooking

Instructions
In a medium microwave safe bowl, combine butter and milk. Heat until butter is just melted (you can also use a stove in a small saucepan)
In a bowl, combine flour, salt and the butter-milk mixture. Knead to make a non-sticky soft and pliable dough (if the dough is too hard, add 1 tablespoon of warm milk at a time until soft)
Using a clean tea towel or cling wrap, cover the bowl. Leave it to rest in room temperature for about 30 minutes
Knead the dough again and divide into 4 equal soft balls
Put the dough onto a floured surface. Let it rest covered for a few minutes more
Roll each ball into a thin round layer
Apply a thin layer of butter on rolled dough; about ¼ teaspoon
Fold in half .. oil/butter on surface roll out again
Repeat
Sprinkle some flour over and gently roll into a size of a chapati/ paratha
On a frying pan over medium heat, add the rolled paratha. Cook until the underside is light brown and bubbles begin to appear on the surface
Flip to the other side. Spread some ghee on the cooked side. Flip again to the other side and spread ghee too. Flip again on both sides until golden brown and well cooked
Serve as desired. Enjoy
 
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Rec

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Any recipes for cooking in double skillet? Going to try the paratha....I used to make all our bread when we had kids at home. Been lazy lately, and eat very little so tend to make rolls and freeze them. My favourite bread was substituting oats for approx a third of the flour , but I tend to shove loads of seeds, nuts, change flour types and don't really have a proper recipe :rolleyes:
 

wildebus

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Possibly available at Falko in Haddington.
I will be paying them a visit for sure :) Maybe treat myself with a Birthday trip out there in the Campervan on Monday and carry on to the seaside for a wee picnic.


Now all this talk about bread ... what about what you put on top?
For the 'German Bread', for me this has to be sliced nice and thin, a buttery spread and either Strawberry Jam or - before I turned Veggie - Schinken (German for Smoked Ham, or specifically in our case a pretty chewy Westfalian Smoked Ham. Lidl often sell a Black Forest Smoked Ham which is similar and nice).
 

nabsim

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Som what breads can you make on a stove top?
 

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Som what breads can you make on a stove top?

Flatbread is generally made on a hot, flat surface, Neil. It's quick and easy.
Pitta, Nan, unleavened etc.etc.
Loads of recipes on Ms. Google.

Colin 🙂🙂🙂
 

moonshadow

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Love making sourdough bread, rolls etc. Found a use for my mother's Le Creuset casserole at last! When I have too much starter I make American style pancakes for breakfast, even took the starter in the van with us one time to be able to have the pancakes. Now I leave it safely tucked up in the fridge until we get home again.
 

RoaminRog

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I had no idea about starters or anything to do with bread making before now, it’s really proving to be an eye opener!
Going to have time to get my head around this subject, when I retire (again) at the end of February.
Thanks for starting this Colin, really enjoying it.
 

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Love making sourdough bread, rolls etc. Found a use for my mother's Le Creuset casserole at last! When I have too much starter I make American style pancakes for breakfast, even took the starter in the van with us one time to be able to have the pancakes. Now I leave it safely tucked up in the fridge until we get home again.

Thanks for the information, Sue.
Everyone making sourdough bread has surplus starter and your idea of using it to make pancakes is a really good tip.
Any chance of a recipe?
And are you aware of any other uses for surplus starter?

Colin 🙂🙂🙂
 

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I had no idea about starters or anything to do with bread making before now, it’s really proving to be an eye opener!
Going to have time to get my head around this subject, when I retire (again) at the end of February.
Thanks for starting this Colin, really enjoying it.

If you're collecting information and equipment prior to making sourdough bread later in the spring, Rog, I'd recommend getting your first sample of starter from someone already in production.
I'd be happy to pass some on but I'm not quite sure when we'll meet up.
On the other hand, if it helps, I could post some to you........

Colin 🙂🙂🙂
 
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