What would your sign say?

Vanterrier

Full Member

Messages
1,408
STAY AT HOME obviously is too complicated a message for some.

Ive never seen so many strangers walking along the footpath through our garden and paddock. Some with dogs off the lead near lambs and in groups. They then wander across fields where there are no rights of way as if they own the bloody place.
I would love to put a sign up to stop them or to close the footpath, but I dont think thats legal and also penalises the few locals who regularly use the path responsibly.
What would your sign say?
K :(
 

Full Member

Full Member

Messages
3,542
Simply
STICK TO THE FxxxxxG FOOTPATH
KEEP YOUR FxxxxxG DOG ON A LEAD
Some members may not know Annie too well and could, through no fault of their own, be confused by the spelling she has offered for the proposed notice boards.
I've known Annie for some years now and can, with a measure of certainty, suggest that the missing letters indicated above with 'xxxxx' are, in alphabetical order, c,i,k,n and u.
I hope that helps.

Colin 🙂🙂🙂
 
Last edited:

Minisorella

Full Member

Messages
1,421
I totally understand the concern about the dogs and lambs but overall it's inevitable there'll be more walkers. Maybe a friendly, informative sign to point out the code for the uninitiated would be a good thing?

I've seen a lot more people out and about walking or cycling here... and a heck of a lot less cars everywhere. None of those out walking have been in groups or doing anything wrong at all... they're just out getting their daily dose of escape and exercise - with or without a dog or kids. A lot more people in my parts would normally get in their cars and go to the coast or the nearby country park or up into St Leonard's Forest, etc, etc. Now they're keeping closer to home and taking the kids to the fields and woods near my house, to the bluebell woods just down the road and to the little local parks. Generally, it's been a lot more friendly too. I've had more cheery chats with people when I've been out sorting the front garden than I've ever had before - at a safe distance of course! Fair's fair. They'll all go back to their usual routine once all this is over and meanwhile everyone's just doing their best to get through it, so let's not be too unwelcoming eh?
 

Ardachaidh

Full Member

Messages
168
Totally agree, Minisorella. We live out in the country in Scotland (which has a "right to roam" responsibly, unlike in England where there seem to loads of restrictions) and think ourselves very lucky. We have a 2 acre plot with lovely views, a river nearby, hills behind, estate and farm tracks left right and centre where we can walk every day straight from our back door and quiet roads (though awful surfaces) for cycling; we see buzzards, kites, peregrines, ducks, herons, oyster catchers, curlews and loads of small birds flying over our plot. Every day we say we are so lucky to live where we do. Many other are not so lucky, holed up in one room shared accommodation, or high rise flats trying to keep the kids amused, do the shopping, worried about their job, money, health, family, no garden to relax in... and so on.

One of the local shepherds is still lambing and has put up a sign asking people not to take dogs into the field where there are lambs and to take another route which bypasses the field - as per Access Legislation. I think that's all that's fair enough.
 

wildebus

Full Member

Messages
2,515
Usually a sign explaining WHY something should not be done is more effective than a "**** OFF" sign.
People who ignore a rational sign will ignore ANY sign you put up.
and many people who will take notice of a proper requesting sign will just ignore a demanding sign as they don't like to be ordered about.
 

Vanterrier

Full Member

Messages
1,408
Thing is the strangers are not from the village a mile away and have travelled here by car, even leaving their cars in gateways and at junctions of the single track roads causing farmers to have to chew up the verges to get around them. Good job its been dry of late.
Dont get me wrong I dont mind having a footpath across our land and have many a chat with walkers in normal times. These are not normal times and Im miffed about those who are not behaving responsibly.
K :(
 

CriftinsCampers

Full Member

Messages
37
We have a young lady with horses that recently bought a field at auction with a very well used foot path that crosses it in three places. She quickly went out of her way to try and obstruct it from day one. There’s nothing that will seemingly wind up locals and rambling groups than attempts to restrict access over these paths, she’s Very inexperienced in country life and not made herself popular!

After several complaints the council turned up, removed her temporary fencing etc and stuck up signs reminding her it is a public footpath and more importantly to the public of their obligations when using it!

so far normality seems to have resumed and I hope it remains that way.

Long before this virus caused hordes to descend on our country lanes, (I have never seen so many strangers out here in the sticks until recently) local farmers were beginning to corridor fence the pathways on both sides to make it 100% clear where people could and could not walk, and to contain dogs whose owners seem unable to attach to a lead around livestock. That seems to work very well.

I am lucky, there’s no public access across my fields but if there was I would fence a corridor as well. You can’t discount the stupidity and arrogance of some people but you can passively manage it.

What you can’t do is threaten to shoot dogs off the lead. It’s hard enough to shoot a Fox in controlled situations, to even attempt to do the same with a dog when the owners or other members of the public are almost certainly in the vicinity puts them at great risk and is asking for trouble. Dogs even at full frenzy when chasing or worse, attacking lambs can usually be caught and handed over to the authorities for them and their owners to be correctly dealt with.

I own three dogs one is a trained flock guardian since the lockdown began we’ve only let our dogs off the leads in our own fields, not when out in public as we would normally do, for a very specific reason I want to be able to control interactions with the increased number of new dogs in our lanes.

Last thing I want is to get close up to a stranger to pull off an aggressive dog or even later have to visit the vet to repair any injuries hence if I see a stranger with a dog off the lead I do ask them to control their dog when passing To avoid risk of us having to get too close most seem to then twig and understand why fortunately.
 

Barge1914

Full Member

Messages
433
Usually a sign explaining WHY something should not be done is more effective than a "**** OFF" sign.
People who ignore a rational sign will ignore ANY sign you put up.
and many people who will take notice of a proper requesting sign will just ignore a demanding sign as they don't like to be ordered about.
The area round here in the Peak District is festooned with signs showing a bloody sheep to show what dear Fido, 'who never did anything like that before' can do. But still daily I see bloody owners waking dogs without leads...and it is lambing season.
 
Top