Fiamma Wall Mounted Awning Foot Brackets

Winks

Full Member
Thinking of getting the awning foot brackets finally fitted to the van, had them from buying the van two years ago.


The large Autotrail tag axle we were parked next to at Chester had them and used them and they did appear to help in getting tension into the fabric of the awning. I'm thinking it would also give us the option of rolling out the awning if we're on a hard standing. As always I am super cautious of leaving the thing out in a puff of wind and would never intend using the wall fixings in any kind of breeze.

Does anyone else use them and what are your comments please?

Cheers

h
 

Pudsey Bear

Full Member
I've had a few vans with them on and only used them once, PITA more often than not as you walk into them, kids don't see them and run into them too.

Your point on hard standings is a good one but a couple of bricks would help out, always pull the awning in if going to be unattended unless it has a safari room attached.
 

HurricaneSmith

Full Member
Those brackets came with our van when we bought it last year.

I looked at them, how they are fixed to the van's wall, the likelihood of wall stress damage, and left them in the box, continuing like you, to use the vertical integrated legs resting directly on the ground.

Others may well have opposite views.
.
 

grath

Full Member
We use ours quite a lot. Good for on hard ground and good for when windy
I fitted them pretty solid and sleeved the bolts. Do not use screws
I wound never have an awning without these supports, it gives you a choice
Never had wall damage
I never leave awning out at night but feel comfortable going walk about when in feet attachment
 

wildebus

Full Member
Those brackets came with our van when we bought it last year.

I looked at them, how they are fixed to the van's wall, the likelihood of wall stress damage, and left them in the box, continuing like you, to use the vertical integrated legs resting directly on the ground.

Others may well have opposite views.
.
I have had these feet in their box for years and every so often think it would be handy to have them available to use, but then I think the same as above and the feet stay in the box a while longer until the next time I think about it.
Think I am going to call them "Groundhog Feet" :D


As I understand it, if staying on French Aires, they don't allow awnings that are supported by legs resting on the ground, so van mounted supports get around that rule should someone come to enforce it?

I'm interested in the comments about people not leaving Awnings out overnight. If I am camped up for more than one night, I don't bring it in between days. Too much hassle (if it is that windy it doesn't come out in the first place!)
 

grath

Full Member
Only once left out over night and wind come from nowhere in middle of night and needed to get up and pull it in.
Also they do tend to flap and the noise would keep me awake.
It would always also have had guy rope to heavy duty stakes
But again they are very very handy when on hard ground
 

Winks

Full Member
I’m thinking that if I do go ahead and fit them I’d be tempted to put a pad of 3mm stainless behind them on the outside at least.

Cheers

H
 

grath

Full Member
I’m thinking that if I do go ahead and fit them I’d be tempted to put a pad of 3mm stainless behind them on the outside at least.

Cheers

H
Sleeve the bolts and pad behind and well sealed
Sleeping enables you to tighten bolts without crushing in the panel
 

cronkle

Full Member
I have used these and they are particularly useful when there is a bit of rain about. I would roll the awning out about a foot to 18 inches and put the legs into the brackets. That would generally stop anything being being blown through the door and soaking everything. If I extended the awning further I would generally put the legs on the ground and secure the whole lot with a tie-down kit. Shouldn't they come with the sleeves as part of the bracket, mine did. I would fit them to my current van but there are doors and hatches where they would need to go.
 

Winks

Full Member
I have used these and they are particularly useful when there is a bit of rain about. I would roll the awning out about a foot to 18 inches and put the legs into the brackets. That would generally stop anything being being blown through the door and soaking everything. If I extended the awning further I would generally put the legs on the ground and secure the whole lot with a tie-down kit. Shouldn't they come with the sleeves as part of the bracket, mine did. I would fit them to my current van but there are doors and hatches where they would need to go.
The kit I have here is indeed sleeved through the wall and its all part of the internal part of the bracket, made out of that very dense, quite oily plastic. The screws are stainless and about 4mm x 30mm and the holes through the wall are 10mm. There's no indication of how high they should be mounted but I'll get them pretty low down I reckon.

Cheers

H
 

SimonM

Full Member
I did consider trying them and then realised one bracket would have to be into a storage door.

Then I worried about pulling the screws out. Securely bolting them would work I guess.

Then realised we don’t really use the awning but 3/4 days a year. So for now it’s legs only.
 

HurricaneSmith

Full Member
The kit I have here is indeed sleeved through the wall and its all part of the internal part of the bracket, made out of that very dense, quite oily plastic. The screws are stainless and about 4mm x 30mm and the holes through the wall are 10mm. There's no indication of how high they should be mounted but I'll get them pretty low down I reckon.

Cheers

H
I've just pulled out my Thule Omnistor 6200 Instructions.

You are absolutely right, because the dimension height is deliberately missing, and a note at the back simply says ".....ask your dealer or manufacturer."

Looks like they are absolving themselves of responsibility, although they do recommend maintaining watertight holes by using acid free silicone or SIKA 252.

I know that before drilling you'll check for obstacles such as cables, gas pipes, etc.
.
 

SueS

Full Member
A note about not leaving awnings rolled out and unattended. We came back from a day out and the awning was sagging with the weight of rain collected in it. We didn't have the horizontal pole to tighten the awning. When it rains now we leave one leg lower than the other so the train runs off. Of course we still roll out in of leaving the site.
My sister's awning ripped when it rained while they were out. Costly business for a few minutes saved by not rolling the awning in
 

SueS

Full Member
We did use the van attached feet on an earlier van and found them useful on hard standing.
 

wildebus

Full Member
If not using the Safari Room, I always leave one end lower (I think it usually has that recommendation in the instructions?).
I had a Kyham Sun Canopy which didn't use any arms for tension and that tended to pool in the middle when it rained. If the rain was quite heavy/continuous I used to use a vertical telescopic pole in the centre of the awning to make a central peak which made the water run off very nicely
 

Linda

Rally Organiser
We have thought about these but since lee nearly knocked himself out on some one else van we're having second thought....
 

Wooie1958

Full Member
Mine sat packed in the locker for a few years then i decided to fit them and now use them regular abroad then the legs don`t touch the ground.

I would never use them in anything more than a gentle wind or leave it unattended or overnight.

Even had it deployed when the Police Municipale have come round several times collecting the money.

They said nothing, in fact they were glad of the shade, took their time and enjoyed a cooling drink on a couple of occasions.

Similarly when the Gendarmerie have driven through, they looked and nodded then drove off.
 

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