Perhaps Battery Powered Motorhomes.....

RV12FUN

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The discussion about ev or not will roll on ( pun intended) This is the new future and learn to adapt is what humans do better than any other species. Lot’s of the conversation seem to be about this article or another and not about real world knowledge with real world experience. Time will show us all as it has done on many occasions.
 

GeoffL

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just skimmed through it, but nowhere did it state unladen weight of semi, against a diesel truck, so is the load compromised?
Payload is most certainly compromised. The Tesla is a "class 8" truck, which means GTM of 80,000 lb (36 tonnes). The 500 mile truck weighs at least 2 tonnes more than the equivalent diesel; and the diesel is rated with GTM of 44 tonnes and so a current Euro 6 diesel has a payload of at least 11 tonnes more than the Tesla.
 

RV12FUN

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Payload is most certainly compromised. The Tesla is a "class 8" truck, which means GTM of 80,000 lb (36 tonnes). The 500 mile truck weighs at least 2 tonnes more than the equivalent diesel; and the diesel is rated with GTM of 44 tonnes and so a current Euro 6 diesel has a payload of at least 11 tonnes more than the Tesla.
Tesco run over a 1000 trucks and nearly all are run at approximately 32 ton as do most supermarkets plus Amazon are the same so when you take all these trucks out of the equation you have a different landscape. Yes for general haulage electric isn’t there but general now makes up such a small percentage of haulage.
 

GeoffL

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Tesco run over a 1000 trucks and nearly all are run at approximately 32 ton as do most supermarkets plus Amazon are the same so when you take all these trucks out of the equation you have a different landscape. Yes for general haulage electric isn’t there but general now makes up such a small percentage of haulage.
FWIW, I'm not against the introduction of EVs so that people can make use of them where and when they make most sense; where market forces and practicability are allowed to prevail. Warburtons is an example. There, EVs are to be used for the "last leg" to deliver into a city with stringent pollution measures. They can also make sense where the daily duty is within the range of the vehicle.
However, I am against their enforced introduction; and I am against that for reasons I've posted upthread. I'm not the only person who has done the maths and even the power distribution industry say the grid can't cope with 100% electrification, particularly since there is another big push to switch home heating from gas, oil, etc. to electricity. This is the reason why the industry want powers to remotely switch off car charging, heating, etc. (and even completely cut off consumers) without compensation. IMO, putting all eggs in one basket is usually a poor option.
That said, the worst thing about this IMO is the disproportionate affect on the less well off and others who can't afford the premium price and/or have nowhere suitable to install a charge point. Banning ICEVs with no suitable alternative puts private motoring beyond the reach of those people for almost all practical purposes.
 

Jenrai

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I think a lot will change in 9 years. Battery weight will come down and range will go up. If the government increased the 3500kg weight you can drive on a standard licence that would go some way to helping with the payload issue. Its only a ban on new sales so diesel mh will be around for a long time after that date.
 

johnjjl

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I think a lot will change in 9 years. Battery weight will come down and range will go up. If the government increased the 3500kg weight you can drive on a standard licence that would go some way to helping with the payload issue. Its only a ban on new sales so diesel mh will be around for a long time after that date.
one local garage was still selling 4 star (leaded) petrol up until a couple of years ago
 

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BBC R4 are broadcasting a three-part series entitled 'Electric Ride UK' on Tuesdays at 1100 which you may find interesting.
The series follows Peter Curran as he drives electric vehicles from Land's End to John o' Groats and covers all sorts of topics currently associated with the technology.


Colin :):):)
 

Pudsey Bear

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I can get R4 on my TV Geoff, I just have other things to do so never listen to the radio in the house unless I'm doing something in the kitchen which I avoid if at all possible.
 

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I can get R4 on my TV Geoff, I just have other things to do so never listen to the radio in the house unless I'm doing something in the kitchen which I avoid if at all possible.
If you would like to listen to any of the broadcasts but can't listen to them live, just click on the link above as Geoff suggested and you can listen on your computer or whatever you're using to post here. You could also use the BBC Sounds app. Usually the BBC has these programmes available for a year or more so there's no rush - you can listen in the background any time whilst using this website if you so choose.

Colin :):):)
 

GeoffL

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From May all new car chargers will be programmed to not operate for 9 hours during the peak times each day: i.e. 8 am. to 11 am. and 4 pm. to 10 pm. -- times when most people arrive at work or return home and plug in. There will also be a random 30 minutes-at-a-time individual delay where the Grid cannot cope. There are also plans to force home owners to install third generation smart meters to permit remote switch off of high energy applications (such as car charging and home heating) or even complete disconnection of individual properties and legislation changes afoot to permit this without compensation. So it seems that the Government has at last accepted that the National Grid cannot cope with its 'all electric' policy.
 

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From May all new car chargers will be programmed to not operate for 9 hours during the peak times each day: i.e. 8 am. to 11 am. and 4 pm. to 10 pm. -- times when most people arrive at work or return home and plug in. There will also be a random 30 minutes-at-a-time individual delay where the Grid cannot cope. There are also plans to force home owners to install third generation smart meters to permit remote switch off of high energy applications (such as car charging and home heating) or even complete disconnection of individual properties and legislation changes afoot to permit this without compensation. So it seems that the Government has at last accepted that the National Grid cannot cope with its 'all electric'
Thanks for your input, Geoff. I guess that you're referring to this piece (or similar):


I rather suspect that the legislation is being put in place to help manage demand on the National Grid should it approach levels which it couldn't cope with rather than to be used on a regular basis. Just as there are (quite rightly) contingency plans in place for fossil fuel supplies to key users in extremis.

Colin :):):)
 
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Pudsey Bear

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To make myself clear. I would watch it on TV but i do not lisyen to radio at home. I record all my TV so if i miss something i can rewind. I'm sure you can do similar on radio but it doesn't hold my attention so I only really listen to music as I know most of it so can wander off.
 

Full Member

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4,565
BBC R4 are broadcasting a three-part series entitled 'Electric Ride UK' on Tuesdays at 1100 which you may find interesting.
The series follows Peter Curran as he drives electric vehicles from Land's End to John o' Groats and covers all sorts of topics currently associated with the technology.


Colin :):):)

A heads up that episode 2 of Peter Curran's electric journey from Land's End to John o' Groats is to be broadcast on BBC R4 tomorrow morning at 1100.

Colin :):):)
 
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